Welcome to Reimagining Europe | Christian Reflections on Brexit

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What future is there for the EU?

Writing from Latvia, Jāna Jeruma-Grinberga the chaplain of St Saviour’s Anglican Church in Riga Latvia, makes the case that the first priority for the EU has to be to ensure that Brexit does not unpick the first stitch which leads to the unravelling of the EU knit. The potential consequences of a Union, disintegrating among recrimination and increased protectionism, are too unpleasant to contemplate. Unity must be maintained.

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Can there be such a thing as a Christian Brexit?

Gregory Cameron writes that though Brexit may not be a spiritual or religious enterprise all the churches, including the Church in Wales, have to engage vigorously in the public debate about Brexit and our society as advocates of a Christian vision of social inclusion and people centred politics. In challenging times of change it falls to us to demonstrate what loving our neighbours really means.

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Scottish identity in a post-Brexit Britain

David Chillingworth tries to make sense of the case for Scottish independence following the referendum decision to leave the EU. Despite passionate and heated arguments on both sides he thinks that the majority of voters remain confused as to how to manage their competing identities. He makes the case that Churches and faith communities should maintain an active neutrality in the debate but press for an inclusive process that allows people to explore the issue quietly and carefully.

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Where Brexit means … significantly more than a soundbite

Katy Hayward moves beyond the Brexit soundbite to look at what Brexit means for the island of Ireland and the fragile peace process that has been secured by Britain’s and Ireland’s membership of the EU.

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Lament for Brexit

Alison Elliot looks at the role the Church can play in encouraging people to sing songs about Brexit – songs of lament, songs of confession, songs of hope. She makes the case that whichever way you voted all these songs are needed today.

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Trading places

Philip Booth take a closer look at several economic forecasts about Brexit. He makes the case that while not being in the single market may make it more difficult for UK companies to export services, completing trade deals in this complex world within one country rather than as one of 28 countries should be more straightforward.

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Article of faith

Dave Landrum makes the case that while for some in the UK the triggering of A50 signifies a tyranny of the majority, for the majority it represents vox populi – a confirmation of faith in democracy. For Christians, the challenges in these turbulent times are to keep calm and carry on, and to seek and affirm vox dei – for the future of the UK and for Europe.

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Negotiating Britain’s divorce from Europe

Sir Stephen Wall writes that over half those who voted in the referendum elected to leave the EU. Just under half voted to remain. Did anyone vote for the ruination which could be our fate if leaders here and on the continent do not step back, look at what is precious in our present relationship and vow to work to preserve it? That requires an adult conversation between our Government and our partners. And between our Government and us, the electorate, in place of the self-serving inanities of Mr Johnson or the empty boasts of Mr Fox.

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Emerging voices after Brexit

Anne Richards takes a fresh look at some of the motivating forces that led many in working classes areas to vote leave. She explores how the world ‘Leave’ has become detached from its political consequences and assumed a life of its own, as a way of getting back something people can cope with, whether that is law, locality or language. A Brexit for the common good might well ask what else Leave voters really want to see gone

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The return of Europe’s nation states

Patrick Curran from Christ Church Vienna explores what the return of Europe’s nation states means for our understanding of Europe – both as a peace project but also in terms of identity.

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